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Posts Tagged ‘Answer Trainings’

Lessons Learned From Ten Years of TISHE

September 12, 2011

The training staff at Answer recently returned from co-hosting our annual Training Institute in Sexual Health Education (TISHE), where we spent a week training 33 professionals from across the country to be better sexuality educators. One would imagine that participants might be wary when they arrive at a remote setting to learn about sexuality education for six days and five nights with a group of strangers. But every year we have had the pleasure of working with passionate, smart and creative participants, who work in small towns, large urban centers and rural America to help young people make healthy and responsible decisions. Generally, these professionals are working with minimal budgets to try and meet the overwhelming and urgent needs of their students. These educators pour themselves into their jobs, recognizing the critical importance of sexuality education.

TISHE 2011

As a sexuality educator who has been working in the field for close to 20 years, I am always looking for new learning opportunities and have been grateful that TISHE continues to provide that for me every summer. Here are some of the valuable lessons I’ve learned from TISHE participants over the past 10 years:

Ignorance is not protection.
TISHE participants have come from states with no health (or sexuality) education requirement, school districts with no formal sex ed curriculum and supervisors who tell staff to just “keep it under the radar.” At the same time, teachers struggle with pregnant middle schoolers, sexting scandals and students who are exploited by much older partners. Yet, teachers are not even allowed to say words like “abortion,” “sexual orientation” or “masturbation.” How can students learn when adults are actively trying to keep young people—and even each other— in the dark?

Money talks.
We’ve all heard this saying—but when it comes to funding for professional development, money isn’t speaking loudly enough. Those of us who do this work every day know the importance of staff development, but the funding, staff and time rarely align with what research and experience show is truly needed. We have had people take vacation time to attend TISHE or pay for TISHE out of pocket because their school or agency wouldn’t cover the cost. Others have been expected to perform their job duties while at TISHE, even though we schedule daily sessions from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. This cannot continue. Both schools and organizations have to allocate sufficient funds and time for ongoing professional development for their staff.

Adults, not teens, are often the problem.
We constantly tell teens that they have to behave in certain ways in order to be healthy and happy, and even if they are willing to take the steps necessary to do so, it’s the adults who get in the way. It is so clear that young people want to learn about sexuality and adults want them to make healthy decisions. Yet how many adults deny young people the life-saving information and skills they need to do so? In some cases, this adult may be a teacher who is overly censored by a conservative political climate; in other cases, it is the power of one vocal parent that causes an entire sex ed program to be canceled. Yet far too many adults keep blaming teens when they don’t make the “right choices.”

TISHE has taught me that we as adults must recognize our role in that failure. This is why a key component of TISHE is building safety and comfort for the participants in order for them to receive peer feedback on ways they can be more effective with the young people with whom they work. If we are going to work with young people, we need to do the necessary work on ourselves to be able to do so comfortably, accurately and effectively.

We have a lot of work ahead of us if we hope to help young people become and stay sexually healthy. Over 350 TISHE participants and 10 years later, some of the same challenges to supporting young people remain, while new challenges have emerged. Yet over the past decade, one thing remains constant: we can always do better. In the coming years, TISHE will be here making sure youth-serving professionals are doing their best to educate young people about sexuality.

For ten years, the Training Institute for Sexual Health Education (TISHE) has been providing a transformative educational experience for school teachers, community educators, counselors, social workers, policy advocates and state department of education staff. Co-sponsored with the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) and led by some of the most experienced trainers in the country, TISHE is a week-long, residential training institute that focuses on helping youth-serving professionals be more effective at working with adolescents. Based on the ICHE (Institute of Community Health Education) model founded in the Pacific Northwest, TISHE has evolved to serve the needs of school- and community-based educators who are all working to improve the sexual health of our nation’s youth. Although TISHE is held in August, it is usually full with a wait list by the previous March.

Learn more about TISHE.

The “N” Word

July 24, 2008

Most people around the world—a lot of children, too, no doubt—know by now what the Rev. Jesse Jackson recently said about what he wanted to do to two important, private body parts that belong to Senator Barack Obama.

The Times ran a recent column on the reasons why the paper did not use Jackson’s “n” word (for “nuts”) when first reporting the story. I was concerned with the column’s quote from a Washington state reader, who said that the paper is edited by “prudish kindergarten teachers.”

I beg to differ; most early childhood teachers are not prudish. The kindergarten and early childhood teachers I have trained are very familiar with young children’s body parts, particularly those that have to do with “peeing” and “pooping.” Many have to answer such questions as: Did her penis fall off? Will mine? What hole does poop come out of?

Not only are these teachers not prudish about body parts, many are comfortable talking about birth and babies. Kids in the early grades want to know: How did I get out of Mommy’s tummy? How do Mommy and Daddy make a baby?

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